Visit The Robbins House

June, July & August: 11-4
(Closed Tuesdays)
September, October: 11-4
(Open Fri-Sun + Columbus Day)

320 Monument Street
Concord MA
(Located opposite the Old North Bridge)

(978) 254-1745

The Robbins House – Concord’s African American History

Welcome

RobbinsHouse

VISIT THE ROBBINS HOUSE

Our site is a 544 sq. ft. historic early 19th century house formerly inhabited by the first generation of descendants of formerly enslaved African American Revolutionary War veteran Caesar Robbins, and by fugitive slave Jack Garrison.

Jack Garrison For Home Page

LEARN THE HISTORY

The stories of the occupants of The Robbins House reveal the ways in which this first generation of free Concord African Americans pursued independence and contributed to the antislavery movement

Map Square

TAKE A WALKING TOUR

We created a map of African American and antislavery history in Concord, MA.

Download the map and take a walking tour of the African American and Antislavery history sites in Concord.

News and Events

Freedom’s Way Hidden Treasures Program— Patriots, Prejudice, And Protest: The Hidden Stories Of Concord’s Early African Americans

Freedom’s Way Hidden Treasures Program— Patriots, Prejudice, and Protest: The Hidden Stories of Concord’s Early African Americans

At The Robbins House Sat. May 19 • 2:45–4:00 PM Our next stop, with time to travel, is the Robbins House, where Peter Robbins’ niece Ellen Garrison talks about being raised in 1820-30s Concord, and the antislavery activism that brought her from Boston to Rhode Island, Maryland, Virginia, Kansas, and California in pursuit of independence at a time of racial injustice.
Freedom’s Way Hidden Treasures Program — Patriots, Prejudice, And Protest: The Hidden Stories Of Concord’s Early African Americans

Freedom’s Way Hidden Treasures Program — Patriots, Prejudice, and Protest: The Hidden Stories of Concord’s Early African Americans

Sat. May 19 • 1:00–2:15 PM • Brister's Hill Meet at Hapgood Wright Town Forest Parking Lot Our program will begin at Brister’s Hill, named after Brister Freeman, a formerly enslaved man who was the second person of African descent to own land in Concord.
Transgressing The Color Line: Depictions Of Free Blacks In The Popular Press

Transgressing the Color Line: Depictions of Free Blacks in the Popular Press

Thursday, May 10 • 7:00-8:00 PM • Concord Museum Join writer and historian Jonathan Michael Square as he analyzes past images of free Africans Americans in New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston that appeared in the popular press.
John Hannigan And The Massachusetts Archives

John Hannigan and the Massachusetts Archives

As soon as restoration of the Robbins House was complete, our nonprofit group turned its attention to the families of color who first lived there. Supported by a Research Inventory grant from MassHumanities in 2012, we sought out John Hannigan, a Brandeis PhD student whose focus was on black soldiers…

Conversations In A Civil Society: Agreeing To Disagree

Conversations in a Civil Society: Agreeing to Disagree

Tuesday, April 3, 2018 • 7–9 PM • Panel Discussion at Concord Carlisle High School • Sponsored by Concord Carlisle Adult and Community Education Come join this discussion on how to navigate our differences: politics, religion, values, life style. How do we learn to have conversations around issues that sometimes divide us? How do we learn to listen better, discuss, and even bridge that divide?
Interpreting Slavery And Freedom In New England

Interpreting Slavery and Freedom in New England

Interpreting Slavery and Freedom in New England: A 2-day Workshop for Interpreters, Educators, and Museum and Historic Site Staff Sponsored by the Center for Reconciliation March 26-27 • 9 AM–4 PM • Providence, RI The Center for Reconciliation hosted a 2-day workshop to help New England’s museum community work through…

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